Getting a flu shot

Seasonal Flu Immunizations

The 2020-2021 flu vaccine will be available beginning October 1!

Getting vaccinated against the flu is the single best way to prevent the flu. The flu vaccine can keep you from getting the flu, make the illness less severe if you do get it, and keep you from spreading the virus to family and other people.

It is recommended that all individuals over the age of six months be vaccinated against the flu this year. Persons at high risk of serious complications from flu are especially advised to get the flu vaccine, including older people, pregnant women and those with asthma, diabetes, or other chronic conditions. Parents and family members of babies less than 6 months of age and people who live with or care for anyone at high risk for complications from the flu, including health care workers, should also get the vaccine.

Schedule (by appointment only)

The flu vaccines will be offered while supplies last to anyone over the age of six months by appointment Mondays through Thursdays 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. and Fridays 8:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. at the following Tulsa Health Department locations:

  • James O. Goodwin Health Center | 5051 S. 129 E. Ave., Tulsa, OK
  • Central Regional Health Center | 315 S. Utica, Tulsa, OK

Call 918-582-9355 to make an appointment or make an appointment request online.

Cost Information

Children through age 18 years are eligible to receive vaccines at no charge through the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program if any of the following apply: they are Medicaid eligible, uninsured, Native American Indian, Native Alaskan, or their insurance policy does not cover vaccines. 

THD currently accepts Cigna, Community Care, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Health Choice, Medicare and SoonerCare Medicaid for immunizations. Coverage can vary among different insurance plans. Please bring your insurance card and photo ID with you. It is always advisable to check with your insurance provider for coverage specifics before receiving immunizations, as you may be responsible for charges that are not covered by your insurance policy.

Regular injectable flu vaccine and flu mist will cost $25. High dose flu vaccine will cost $63. The cost for regular flu vaccine may be waived for uninsured adults who qualify.  

Vaccine Information for 2020-2021

The Tulsa Health Department has quadrivalent vaccine available while supplies last for adults and children over six months of age. The Tulsa Health Department will have limited supplies of the nasal mist vaccine and the high-dose vaccine for individuals age 65 and older. 

The 2020-2021 seasonal flu vaccination requires only one shot for most individuals. Children under age nine who have not received two flu immunizations before July 1, 2020 will need a second dose at least 4 weeks after receiving the first dose.

The most important thing is to get a flu vaccine every year. Talk to your doctor or nurse about the best options for you and your loved ones.

Vaccination Form

You can save time by downloading and completing a flu vaccination form and bringing it with you when you visit the clinic:

Weekly Flu Update

During flu season, the Oklahoma State Department of Health provides weekly updates about their flu surveillance system on the OK FluView. The updates are posted each Thursday by 10 a.m. THD is also offering a Tulsa County specific report based on OSDH's weekly report found here: http://bit.ly/THDfludata

Flu and COVID-19

Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. Flu and COVID-19 share many characteristics, but there are some key differences between the two. While more is learned every day, there is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and the virus that causes it. This table​ compares COVID-19 and flu, given the best available information to date.

Will there be flu along with COVID-19 in the fall and winter?
While it’s not possible to say with certainty what will happen in the fall and winter, CDC believes it’s likely that flu viruses and the virus that causes COVID-19 will both be spreading. In this context, getting a flu vaccine will be more important than ever. CDC recommends that all people 6 months and older get a yearly flu vaccine.

Can I have flu and COVID-19 at the same time?
Yes. It is possible have flu, as well as other respiratory illnesses, and COVID-19 at the same time. Health experts are still studying how common this can be. Some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, making it hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. Diagnostic testing can help determine if you are sick with flu or COVID-19. Call the Tulsa Health Department at 918-582-9355 to make an appointment to be tested for either illness.

Is COVID-19 more dangerous than flu?
Flu and COVID-19 can both result in serious illness, including illness resulting in hospitalization or death. While there is still much to learn about COVID-19, at this time, it does seem as if COVID-19 is more deadly than seasonal influenza; however, it is too early to draw any conclusions from the current data. This may change as we learn more about the number of people who are infected who have mild illnesses.

Will a flu vaccine protect me against COVID-19?
Getting a flu vaccine will not protect against COVID-19, however flu vaccination has many other important benefits. Flu vaccines have been shown to reduce the risk of flu illness, hospitalization and death. Getting a flu vaccine this fall will be more important than ever, not only to reduce your risk from flu but also to help conserve potentially scarce health care resources.

Does a flu vaccination increase your risk of getting COVID-19?
There is no evidence that getting a flu vaccination increases your risk of getting sick from a coronavirus, like the one that causes COVID-19.

FAQs

When should I get vaccinated?
You should get a flu vaccine before flu viruses begin spreading in your community, since it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against flu. Make plans to get vaccinated early in fall, before flu season begins. CDC recommends that people get a flu vaccine by the end of October. However, getting vaccinated early (for example, in July or August) is likely to be associated with reduced protection against flu infection later in the flu season, particularly among older adults. Vaccination should continue to be offered throughout the flu season, even into January or later. Children who need two doses of vaccine to be protected should start the vaccination process sooner, because the two doses must be given at least four weeks apart.

Will there be changes in how and where flu vaccine is given this fall and winter?
How and where people get a flu vaccine may need to change due to the COVID-19 pandemic. CDC works with healthcare providers and state and local health departments to develop contingency plans on how to vaccinate people against flu without increasing their risk of exposure to respiratory germs, like the virus that causes COVID-19, and has released Interim Guidance for Immunization Services During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Some settings that usually provide flu vaccine, like workplaces, may not offer vaccination this upcoming season, because of the challenges with maintaining social distancing.